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Volume 04

1Casa News from Spain - No. 4
 
 
Information for Foreigners NOW! – With the people that have registered at the Town Hall and those that haven’t, there is a population of approximately 2,000 foreigners in Alora. An information office for the above residents will help with the language barrier and the laws. For the new residents who do not speak Spanish or know the laws and regulations it can mean, in a lot of cases, they can commit offences without knowledge.  Because of this, quite a few villages around Malaga are already offering information offices for foreigners.  It is about time Alora had one too!
Some town halls close to Alora, with a large population of foreigners (most of them being British) have seen a positive outcome from these information offices.  Not only with the language barrier, but also to help with the laws, the Spanish way of life and to understand how important it is to become a resident in the local community.  There is no doubt that this will be a benefit to everyone. An office, open for one hour for 4/5 days a week with somebody that speaks English to help with problems and questions, would be enough.  The benefits of offering this information service in English will be enormous.
Malaga C.F - Malaga played away in a local derby match at Real Betis, Seville.  The final score of 1:1 leaves Malaga mid table in La Liga.New air route - Jet2.com, the low cost airline based at the Leeds-Bradford airport in the north of England, has announced a new route. As from December the company will operate flights between Manchester and the Spanish cities of Malaga, Murcia and Valencia. Daily flights to Malaga will start on February 4th (Sur in English 5 November to 11 November 2004).
PC works in London yet lives 12,000 miles away! - For six months of the year Chris McKee works as a police constable in west London.  His life and work as a Metropolitan Police officer seem unexceptional - except that to get home he has to fly 12,000 miles.
 
One of a number of international commuters in the police force, "home" for PC McKee is the New Zealand city of Dunedin. Other Met officers have set up home in France and Spain.
 
PC McKee, 48, is able to make the long trip to South Island because of flexible working hours. Uniformed officers work seven 12-hour days in return for getting the next week off. This allows the beat officers to live "the dream" of a crash pad in the capital, while their main home is a large detached house somewhere warm and foreign.
 
In PC McKee's case the 26-hour flight home to his wife and five children, aged three to 18, is well worth it. He paid £150,000 for a five-bedroomed house with large grounds in a smart suburb of Dunedin. The officer, who earns £30,000 a year and works in Hammersmith, said "It's a long way to travel but it's worth it to give my family a standard of living we could only dream about in England. The value of my house would barely buy a two-bedroomed flat in London." He added "It works very well for me. It is actually easier for me to do my job than it was when I lived in England. I used to take all the stress of my job home with me and it was hard to relax. Now I'm a lot more fun with the kids when I am in New Zealand and I can be totally focused on what I am doing at work."Although commuting to New Zealand may be a little extreme there are many people with homes and families in Spain, who commute weekly.
James Arthur has been flying into Malaga on a Friday night and back out to the UK on the early flight on Monday morning, he says “My family are extremely happy here, the life style is better than we could afford at home, less crime so I don’t worry when I am away during the week and the trip from office in London to front door in sunny Spain is only 30 mins more than when we lived in England. No sitting in traffic jams getting worked up, in fact I have the flight to relax so I am ready for fun with the kids. I just wish I had done it years ago”